Category Archives: OTHER PEOPLE OTHER PLACES

Side Effects of Chronic Pain | The Mighty

Chronic pain isn’t just constant pain, though that would be more than enough for anyone to handle. The truth is that chronic pain always brings friends. These added challenges are obvious, but rarely taken into consideration by “healthy” people. Remembering that like all bullies, chronic pain travels with a gang can help to better understand the life of someone in chronic pain.

Source: Side Effects of Chronic Pain | The Mighty

THE RED SHOES

A DIFFERENT DISEASE BUT YET ANOTHER CASE OF BEING TREATED AND THEN SENT OUT INTO THE WORLD WITHOUT SUPPORT. THANK GOD FOR THE ONLINE COMMUNITIES. I CAME OUT OF YESTERDAY FEELING  “EMPOWERED” BECAUSE I HAVE REFUSED TO SIMPLY DO AS I WAS TOLD, OR AGREE WITH WHAT THE MEDICOS TOLD ME WHEN I DIDN’T AGREE AT ALL.  MANY OF THE ISSUES I HAVE ARGUED WHINGED AND ALIENATED PEOPLE OVER – HAVE PROVEN TO BE  TRUE. BRAVO TO ALL OF US.

From Sole to SoulWhen I was diagnosed with thyroid cancer in January 2015, my life changed.  This might seem an obvious statement, but it did not change in the ways you might expect.  Or at least, not only in the ways you might expect.There were tears, fear and grief.  A reshuffling of priorities.  Scheduling of surgeries and biopsies and medications and scans and blood tests.  So many bloody blood tests.But there was also a strength that emerged and continues to surge through me, like nothing I’ve ever felt before.  There’s a strange sense of relief.  Scintillating clarity.  Lots of hugs, and “I love yous”.  Precious nurturing.  Above all, a re-connection to spirituality, my relationship with which had become faint and trivialised in my life.  A sense that I truly am being taken care of, both physically and within a bigger picture.  And a red-hot feistiness that insists it’s not my time to go yet, with still far too much to do, see, achieve and experience on this planet.In short, I’ve become more myself this year than I have ever been.  I know who I am, what I need and what I want for myself, my health and my life.The strength and positivity I’ve found through this journey have not come about through band-aid like optimism. They’ve appeared when I’m honest, real and learning to move through life, day by day, with a focus on what works, what helps and what I need.In creating this blog, I want to share the journey with you.  Not just the journey of the challenges and practicalities of dealing with cancer (of which there was startlingly little information available), but also the gifts, strengths and inner resources this experience is revealing to me.  I want to share stories of recovery, insights, what worked, what didn’t and how we can make this journey a little less lonely for us all.

Source: THE RED SHOES

Eileen Rubin – ARDS Survivor – ARDS Global

Once at the ER, Eileen was placed on oxygen and admitted directly into the Medical Intensive Care Unit. That evening, her kidneys failed. A little over twenty-four hours later, she went into respiratory arrest and was intubated. Although a definitive precipitating cause was never revealed, Eileen was diagnosis with both Sepsis and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome. Eileen’s husband, parents, two brothers, and twin sister were told the prognosis of ARDS: her chances of survival were not good.Eileen was forced into a drug-induced coma, insulted with tubes and assaulted with machines throughout her body. As the days turned into weeks, the physicians told her family the grim reality of her illness: it was time to start thinking about removing her from the ventilator; it was a “quality of life issue” because if she did survive, they said, she would likely “never breathe on her own again.” Her family refused to give up hope and sat with her each day, all day, talking to her, singing to her, just holding her hand. A tracheotomy was performed after she was hospitalized for about two weeks since it was clear she was nowhere near getting off the ventilator.

Source: Eileen Rubin – ARDS Survivor – ARDS Global

Decreased Glasgow Coma Scale Score Does Not Mandate Endotracheal Intubation in the Emergency Department

AbstractBackground: Decreased consciousness is a common reason for presentation to the emergency department (ED) and admission to acute hospital beds. In trauma, a Glasgow Coma Scale score (GCS) of 8 or less indicates a need for endotracheal intubation. Some advocate a similar approach for other causes of decreased consciousness, however, the loss of airway reflexes and risk of aspiration cannot be reliably predicted using the GCS alone.Study Objective: A survey of all poisoned patients with a decreased GCS who were admitted to an ED short-stay ward staffed by experienced emergency physicians, to establish the incidence of clinically significant aspiration or other morbidities and endotracheal intubation.Methods: A prospective, observational study was conducted of all patients admitted to the ED short-stay ward with a decreased level of consciousness (GCS < 15).Results: The study included 73 patients with decreased consciousness as a result of drug or alcohol intoxication. The GCS ranged from 3 to 14, and 12 patients had a GCS of 8 or less. No patient with a GCS of 8 or less aspirated or required intubation. There was one patient who required intubation; this patient had a GCS of 12 on admission to the ward.Conclusions: This study suggests that it can be safe to observe poisoned patients with decreased consciousness, even if they have a GCS of 8 or less, in the ED.

Source: Decreased Glasgow Coma Scale Score Does Not Mandate Endotracheal Intubation in the Emergency Department

Gaslighting: How To Spot This Type Of Psychological Abuse – mindbodygreen

In case you’re unfamiliar with the term gaslighting, I’ll tell you that it’s a form of psychological abuse in which a loved one presents you with false information and then doggedly insists it’s true, causing you, over time, to question your perception of reality and to blame yourself for the other person’s actions and any problems in your relationship with that person. Often, gaslighting behaviors are perpetrated by partners to cover up sexual infidelity, financial shenanigans, or some other ongoing bad behavior.One of the most disturbing facets of gaslighting is that everyone is vulnerable—even incredibly intelligent and emotionally stable individuals. In part this is because, as human beings, our natural tendency is to believe what the people we love and trust tell us. So rather than questioning a loved one, we tend to defend and make excuses for the person, even if the behavior we’re willfully ignoring hurts us directly.Moreover, gaslighting is just plain hard to spot because it tends to start slowly, with small lies and believable excuses. “I’m sorry I’m late, honey. I’ve got a big project at work and I lost track of time.” A loving spouse would hardly question that statement. Over time, of course, the lies get bigger and the excuses get flimsier, but we might not notice because the escalation is so gradual. In some ways, it’s like putting a frog in a pot of water that is set to slowly boil. Because the temperature increases only gradually, the frog doesn’t notice that it’s being cooked.

Source: Gaslighting: How To Spot This Type Of Psychological Abuse – mindbodygreen

The wild woman in Irish myth – The Art of Enchantment

This is some of what I wrote about Mis in If Women Rose Rooted:Sometimes, madness seems like the only possible response to the insanity of the civilised world; sometimes, holding ourselves together is not an option, and the only way forwards is to allow ourselves to fall apart. As the story of Mis shows, that madness can represent an extreme form of initiation, a trigger for profound transformation.

Source: The wild woman in Irish myth – The Art of Enchantment